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DateTime::Monotonic cpan:JMASLAK last updated on 2018-12-05

DateTime-Monotonic-0.0.4/

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NAME

DateTime::Monotonic - is a Never-Decreasing Time-Elapsed Counter

SYNOPSIS

#
# Procedural Interface
#
use DateTime::Monotonic :ALL;

my $start = monotonic-seconds;
# Do something that takes time here
my $end = monotonic-seconds;

say "Processing took at least {$end - $start} seconds";


#
# OO Interface
#

use DateTime::Monotonic;

my $tm = DateTime::Monotonic.new;

my $start = $tm.seconds;
# Do something that takes time here
my $end = $tm.seconds;

say "Processing took at least {$end - $start} seconds";

DESCRIPTION

DateTime::Monotonic is A Never-Decreasing Time-Elapsed Counter.

This means that for any given instance of DateTime::Monotonic, the time will always increment, never decrement, even if the system clock is adjusted.

On Linux, this will use a monotonic second counter that is independent of the time-of-day clock. This allows reasonably accurate time measurements independent of the system clock being changed.

On non-Linux hosts, this will simulate a monotonic second counter by treating negative time shifts between successive calls to seconds as if no time elapsed. It will continue to be impacted by time shifts forward.

The procedural iterface uses a single, global, instance of DateTime::Monotonic initialized with default options. The OO instance allows multiple independent, instances of DateTime::Monotonic to be created. Each one independently starts counting from the first call of seconds on that instance.

Procedural Interface

The procedural interface provides a simple way of accessing a globally-shared (within program scope) monotonic clock. It starts counting from the first access ("time zero").

To export all symbols, import the :ALL tag. Each procedure also has a tag (the name of the sub, prefaced by a colon) by which it is exported.

monotonic-seconds(-->Numeric:D)

Returns relative time between this call and the first procedural interface call.

On the first procedural call, this will return "time zero" which is the value 0. Following calls to seconds will return the time elapsed (in seconds, including fractional seconds) since this "time zero".

On Linux systems, this will provide reasonably accurate time regardless of system clock adjustement.

On Non-Linux systems, this will provide an always-incrementing number which will not be accurate with adjustments. If the time-of-day clock would indicate time went backwards between the procedural call and the previous procedural call, this sub will return the previous result (I.E. the number returned will be the same as if no time elapsed between calls). If time is adjusted forward between calls, this will return a value that appears to have caused more time to elapse than actually has elapsed - but it will always be in a forward direction.

This sub is thread safe.

monotonic-whole-seconds(-->Int:D)

This is merely a wrapper around monotonic-seconds that provides the same result as monotonic-seconds but without the decimal component.

This sub is thread safe.

ATTRIBUTES

has-monotonic-support

This is True on systems with monotonic counters that are supported by this module (currently just Linux). If true, you can measure time elapsed reasonably accurately even if the system clock is adjusted.

If this is False, the monotonic support is emulated, subject to the limitations described below under seconds.

METHODS

seconds(-->Numeric:D)

Returns relative time between this seconds call and the first seconds call of this instance of DateTime::Monotonic.

On the first call for an instance of DateTime::Monotonic, will return "time zero" which is the value 0. Following calls to seconds will return the time elapsed (in seconds, including fractional seconds) since this "time zero".

On Linux systems, this will provide reasonably accurate time regardless of system clock adjustement.

On Non-Linux systems, this will provide an always-incrementing number which will not be accurate with adjustments. If the time-of-day clock would indicate time went backwards between a seconds call and the previous seconds call, this method will return the previous result (I.E. the number returned will be the same as if no time elapsed between calls). If time is adjusted forward between calls, this will return a value that appears to have caused more time to elapse than actually has elapsed - but it will always be in a forward direction.

This method is thread safe.

BUGS

While there are no known bugs, this module does not yet support non-Linux OSes fully. It will provide non-reversing time on those systems, but the module could be improved by adding additional OS support.

EXPRESSING APPRECIATION

If this module makes your life easier, or helps make you (or your workplace) a ton of money, I always enjoy hearing about it! My response when I hear that someone uses my module is to go back to that module and spend a little time on it if I think there's something to improve - it's motivating when you hear someone appreciates your work!

I don't seek any money for this - I do this work because I enjoy it. That said, should you want to show appreciation financially, few things would make me smile more than knowing that you sent a donation to the Gender Identity Center of Colorado (See http://giccolorado.org/. This organization understands TIMTOWTDI in life and, in line with that understanding, provides life-saving support to the transgender community.

If you make any size donation to the Gender Identity Center, I'll add your name to "MODULE PATRONS" in this documentation!

AUTHOR

Joelle Maslak [email protected]

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

Copyright © 2018 Joelle Maslak

This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the Artistic License 2.0.